Literacy Workshops


About the Literacy Workshop

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This workshop complements teaching methods by providing active, exciting techniques that get students involved. The goal of this process is to improve analytical thinking, exercise interpersonal communication and build confidence in decision making.

 

 

•It encourages participants to identify the who, what, where when and why of a piece of literature.
•It challenges everyone to get on their feet, text in hand, in order to activate a story through performance.
•It develops a supportive, collaborative process and asks students to read aloud.
•And it provides techniques that illuminate subtleties of mood, complexities of character, and, most importantly, the story’s relevance to the reader.

The First Literacy Workshop

The first workshop was held at the Providence Athenaeum in 2001. It has become a popular program with the educational community throughout the state. Teachers and librarians have had this to say:

“It helps engage students, rids them of passivity and ‘re-injects’ drama in our standards-based approach….Helps in role-playing and value building through immersing them in a variety of character education contexts.”

“To read it with others helped to achieve different perspectives and points of view. To think of multidimensional (movement, action, multiples voices) characteristic of a piece of literature was amazing!”

“We often read about the effects of television on children and we complain about how our students no longer read with pleasure or understanding. LIVING LITERATURE is a creative, exciting response to this literacy crisis…”

Recent participants have shared:

“I was very impressed with your presentation that I attended at the
Athenaeum…. It was a most interesting and enjoyable experience, and one that I have implemented both directly and indirectly in my classroom over the past year and a half.”

“The idea of transforming poetry and literature into performance pieces is a very useful learning tool and the actor/teachers present the techniques in an inventive and accessible way….Performance, both on an informal and larger scale is a vital learning tool and giving these skills back to an audience is an important part of the learning process.”

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